Launch in 32-bit Mode

All current Manifold versions and licenses are designed for fully 64-bit operation.    However, not all other software is 64-bit software like Manifold.  Sometimes we would like to launch a 32-bit version of Manifold for compatibility with other software that is limited to 32-bit operation.   Sometimes we will want to do that even when running within a 64-bit Windows system.  

 

We might think that if we are running 64-bit Windows, hat we would always run Manifold in 64-bit mode as well.  Unfortunately, key accessory software packages, including essential accessories provided by Microsoft such as the Access Database Engine, might only be available in 32-bit mode.  In such cases, to use the capabilities those Microsoft facilities provide we must launch Manifold in 32-bit mode, even if we are running in 64-bit Windows.

 

The main reason to launch 32-bit Manifold in 64-bit Windows is to import to or to link to formats managed using Microsoft's Access Database Engine code if Microsoft's own compatibility issues force us to install 32-bit Access Database Engine in 64-bit Windows.  In addition to Access .mdb that includes other formats often used by Microsoft products such as .db, .html. .xls and .wkx.  See the discussion in the Microsoft Office Formats - MDB, XLS and Friends topic.

 

This topic applies to both Manifold and also to the free Manifold Viewer package.

Launching 32-bit Manifold in 32-bit Windows

If we are running 32-bit Windows, whenever we launch Manifold it always runs in 32-bit mode - there is no other choice with 32-bit Windows.  If we download and install Manifold using Windows Installer style .exe files, we will download and install using the 32-bit package and the only choice we will have for Manifold will be to launch in 32-bit mode.  

 

eg_datasrc32_01_00.png

 

If we have installed Manifold from the .exe installation file that installs using Windows Installer, the 32-bit form of Manifold can be launched by drilling down into the Start button menu, as seen above, a screenshot from Windows 10.  There is no 64-bit form of Manifold installed in 32-bit Windows, since 32-bit Windows cannot run 64-bit software.

 

If we are using a portable installation, we launch from within the bin hierarchy.

 

dlg_launch_32bit_mfd_portable01_01.png

 

Portable installations for Manifold / Viewer create a hierarchy of files.   The files in the bin folder are 32-bit.   To launch the 32-bit version go into the bin folder.

 

dlg_launch_32bit_mfd_portable01_02.png

 

Within the bin folder, double-click on manifold.exe to launch Manifold in 32-bit mode.

 

Launching 32-bit Manifold within 64-bit Windows

Whenever a 64-bit Manifold installation is installed within 64-bit Windows, both 32-bit and a 64-bit forms of Manifold are installed and ready to use.

 

eg_datasrc01_00.png

 

If we have installed Manifold from the .exe installation file that installs using Windows Installer, the 32-bit form of Manifold can be launched by drilling down into the Start button menu, as seen above, a screenshot from Windows 10.

 

If we are using a portable installation, we launch from within the bin hierarchy.

 

dlg_launch_32bit_mfd_portable01_01.png

 

Portable installations for Manifold / Viewer create a hierarchy of files.   The files in the bin folder are 32-bit.   The files in the bin64 folder are 64-bit.   To launch the 32-bit version go into the bin folder.

 

dlg_launch_32bit_mfd_portable01_02.png

 

Within the bin folder, double-click on manifold.exe to launch Manifold in 32-bit mode.

Important

Whether we launch Manifold from the Windows start button system or from within a portable installation, Manifold looks and runs the same.   We have to look into the Help - About dialog to see if Manifold has been launched in 32-bit mode or 64-bit mode.

 

See Also

Getting Started

 

MDB Microsoft Access

 

Example: Closing without Saving - An example that shows how File - Close without saving the project can affect local tables and components differently from those saved already into a data source, such as an .mdb file database.

 

Example: Switching between Manifold and Native Query Engines - How to use the !manifold and !native commands to switch a query in the Command window from use the Manifold query engine to whatever query engine is provided by a data source.

 

Example: Create a New Data Source from a Manifold Image Server - Manifold image server modules are snippets of code which use the Manifold Image Server Interface (ISI) to automatically fetch image tiles from popular image servers like Virtual Earth, Wikimapia, Yahoo!, Google Maps, Yandex and many others. Image servers can provide street maps, overhead satellite imagery, combinations of streets and satellite imagery and other data as well.  Using Manifold Image Servers is one of the most popular Manifold features.

 

Example: Create a New Data Source from a MAP File - Create a new data source from an existing Manifold .map project file.   This is the classic way to nest projects, one calling another, to create libraries of data and projects.   Access to nested projects has effectively zero performance loss and the links within projects take up effectively zero space so we can create huge constellations of data at our fingertips.

 

Example: Create a Data Source within an Existing Data Source - When a data source is writable, for example, if the data source is a Manifold .map file, we can work within that data source as if it were at the top level of our project.   For example, we can create a new data source that is nested within the existing data source.   This example shows how.

 

Example: Modify GPKG Geometry with SQL then Add Drawing - This topic provides a "Hello, World" example that shows a simple, but typical, task involving spatial data.  We will take a country-sized data set in GeoPackage (GPKG) format and change all areas in the data to the boundary lines for those areas and then save those boundary lines as a new table.  We add a spatial index to the table and create a new drawing to visualize the new table.

 

Microsoft Office Formats - MDB, XLS and Friends